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Terry Rossio has put up a new entry today. Most of the specifics are about DMC and the run up to its release, plus reflections on life in the industry. At the end, after talking about the final wrap, he has a cute mention of Orlando. There are some other mentions, but this was my favorite. :porkpie:

Thing about working in the movie business is, you're always out of a job. Losing one's job is one of the most psychologically challenging events one can face . and for people on a film set, it's a way of life, you're never more than a few months away from another job search. The gypsy life. It affects everyone, grips and production assistants, producers and camera crew. Even actors. Even top actors. And writers. Orlando asks what we're planning to do next, and I tell him we'd like to try our hand at a western. He starts to pitch a book he loves, with a role he'd like to play, an English gunslinger who comes to the old west. The end of Pirates is still months away, but we're already planning the next gig. On the day of Orlando's picture wrap, he gives me a hug, walks away -- turns and shouts, "English gunslinger!"
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That was a great quote and I hope he can play that "English gunslinger" I would love to see him in a western. :wub: I grew up with the John Wayne classics thanks to my dad, so I have a thing for cowboys. :blush: Thanks for that Patty.

:heart:

~Kit-Kat~

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Thanks Patty . :2thumbs:

That's a cool quote. I want to know what book that was so I can read it! Orlando as an English Gunslinger? Ohhhhh, that does things to me! :throb: :swoon:

CaliMom , I love that picture. He's like a little boy playing dress up. Bless him. He obviously had fun doing that shoot. I wonder if he'd read this book at that point? Hmmmmmmmm, intriguing. :hmmm:

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I love a good western and have been a fan all my life. After thinking on this for a while, I'd love to see an update of the classic TV series "Have Gun, Will Travel". The premise of this show, from the late 50's, early 60's was that the protagonist led a dual life as a wealthy man-of-the-world residing in a San Francisco hotel, and as a black-clothed gunfighter-for-hire. It was set in the 1870's and there is no reason he couldn't be English. Also, note the character's signature black-clothing .

:porkpie:

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  • 3 months later...

Terry Rossio's MySpace blog has been updated with some thoughts on DMC and AWE. No real mentions of Orlando, except that they had a birthday party for him, but as always it's a fascinating look from the writer's point of view.

It's very long, but here are a few excerpts:

My brother visits the Pirates Palmdale set, seeing it all for the first time, and he happens to come on an odd day. All the actors are in the Black Pearl and the entire ship is filled to the brim with round blue plastic balls. It's the shot where the crabs overflow and pour out into the sea, but the crabs are created later via CGI, on set all we see are these blue plastic balls. So everyone is swimming around in these balls acting like kids, actors and crew in a goofy mood, a mock fight breaks out, people flinging the balls at each other, and they're bouncing everywhere. To my brother it must look like making a film is just goofy fun, and I guess it is. Later, Michael Singer shows me a press release written on that day, titled "Blue Balls to Crabs."

Weeks later, we're still finding those blue plastic balls on the set. Gore's kids play with them, the extras and PAs throw them at each other. I stop by a group trying to juggle and offer a few tips, and impress them with my (limited) juggling skills. I show off a few moves and move on while they're still impressed, before I have a chance to screw up.

*********

In Palmdale, Gore calls me to set, he needs a quick exchange between Pintel and Ragetti as they pass by camera, and he needs it in the next two minutes, as the shot is up. I confer with Lee and Mackenzie, none of our ideas are particularly inspired. We finally hit on the "And in case you haven't noticed, it's raining," "I think that's a bad sign" exchange, which struck us as funny -- as if the appearance of a fifty foot tall goddess isn't a bad sign, or the fact that they face an unbeatable Armada, etc. So it gets shot and it's in the movie, and for me it doesn't quite work, it's one of those lines that's only funny in theory, not really that funny in fact. Also one of those lines you keep re-writing long after the film is done ... maybe it should have been, Pintel "... EVERY ten years he can come ashore ..." Ragetti "No, AFTER ten years, if his love is true ..."

********

FLASHBACK - PIRATES FUN FACT: Shooting Curse of the Black Pearl, Jimmy Buffett came by to visit the set. Have I mentioned there are two Buffett tributes in that film? The name of AnaMaria's ship, the Jolly Mon, is an homage to Buffett's song of the same name (and the story the song is based on). And once again I feel compelled to note that AnaMaria's name was not chosen as a combination of Ann Bonny and Mary Reid, instead, it's my daughter's middle name!

Second tribute is Jack's triple slap in the course of the film, "I didn't deserve that," "I may have deserved that," "That one I deserved." Jack's responses are an homage to the progression in Margaritaville, "It's nobody's fault," "It could be my fault," "It's my own damn fault."

It happens often enough on set that we need some sort of period sailing command, period personal insult, or exclamation, I come up with the idea of the 'cheat sheet.' It's a listing of various flavorful expressions of the era, organized by category, for myself and for Gore to keep in his back pocket, in case he needs to have a character call out something more interesting than Raise the mainsail!' I'm always trying to add to it because we're always running out, scanning Shakespeare lines, writing down colorful expressions the Brits use on set, stuff like "ill-bred hugger-mugger" and "Mother Carey's chickens!" and "Toad-spotted bum-baily!" Johnny particularly likes the commands that sound vaguely scatological, like ""Furl all futtock-shrouds abaft the girtline!"

Though there is a line in the film, from Kevin, "Slap me thrice and hand me to my mama!" which I like because it sounds authentic, like it had to be period expression of some sort, but it's not, it's completely invented.

********

Mystery of the end credits is solved. I get a report from Susan, "In the Multiple Jacks scene some of those Jacks have tattoos different that those we know of as being Jack Sparrow's. Johnny picked the content of those tattoos himself. In some cases, they are visible/readable in the finished film, and where they are readable, they have to be cleared. One includes a line(s) from the Saroyan play, the other from the poem credited at the end."

At dinner, chat with Jerry and his wife about the Internet fans, of course he doesn't have time to track message boards and such. I try to describe the depth with which the fans analyze the films, such as the 250 post thread on the topic of, "Should Norrington have left the Black Pearl and positioned his troops at the mouth of the cave at Isla Muerta or should he have trusted Jack and stayed on the ship."

Johnny Depp and his wife Vanessa join us this year for dinner, and afterwards we head over for the midnight showing at the El Capitan. So, if any of you out there reading were watching At World's End there that night, opening night, you might not have noticed, but Johnny Depp, Gore, and Bruckheimer were there in the theater with you.

**********

Geoffrey Rush's gift to Ted and I had all the class and elegance one would expect from Geoffrey Rush: a single, shiny, shiny, elegant black pearl in an elegant black case. The accompanying note from Geoffrey is even more cherished (reprinted here):

"Dear Terry ... this is the sort of speech I think Gibbs should get! Most likely it would be cut but with a good West Country Accent, who knows? I turned down a Beckett play to do Curse of the Black Pearl and was pilloried by my peers -- little did I know I was venturing into the world of popcorn, Wagner, mythological expressionism, finely wrought textual intensity and the true Shakespearean pleasure of laying bare the state of the world! Here's a small emblemic memento of our crazy ride together on the Black Pearl." -- Yours, Geoffrey Rush

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My daughter Janay comes to visit the set, and she brings a photograph of a horse, owned by a friend of hers, this particular horse is registered with the name 'Captain Jack Sparrow." Janay wants me to have Johnny Depp sign the photo. I have never asked Johnny for anything, but how can I turn this down? The sun goes to my head and I agree to give it a shot. After a story meeting, I hang back in Johnny's trailer. Everyone else leaves and Johnny kind of looks at me. What else to say? I blurt out, "I have a picture of a horse." Right away he shoots back "Would you like to be alone?" I explain the situation, this is the only horse that can ever have this particular name, Johnny is amazed, befuddled, and happily signs.
:lmao2:

You've just got to love a man who is that quick-witted.

Thanks for the heads up Christine.

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In Palmdale, Gore calls me to set, he needs a quick exchange between Pintel and Ragetti as they pass by camera, and he needs it in the next two minutes, as the shot is up. I confer with Lee and Mackenzie, none of our ideas are particularly inspired. We finally hit on the "And in case you haven't noticed, it's raining," "I think that's a bad sign" exchange, which struck us as funny -- as if the appearance of a fifty foot tall goddess isn't a bad sign, or the fact that they face an unbeatable Armada, etc. So it gets shot and it's in the movie, and for me it doesn't quite work, it's one of those lines that's only funny in theory, not really that funny in fact. Also one of those lines you keep re-writing long after the film is done . maybe it should have been, Pintel "... EVERY ten years he can come ashore ." Ragetti "No, AFTER ten years, if his love is true ."

Funny he didn't think that line worked. I think it's my daughter's favourite line in the whole movie. (Certainly the one she quotes most often.) I personally like the fact that it basically has nothing to do with the plot-at-large.

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So, if any of you out there reading were watching At World's End there that night, opening night, you might not have noticed, but Johnny Depp, Gore, and Bruckheimer were there in the theater with you.
:O

Thanks KLSMom for bringing it over. Jackie that was hilarious! And I agree, you gotta love the quick wit! :lmao:

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So, if any of you out there reading were watching At World's End there that night, opening night, you might not have noticed, but Johnny Depp, Gore, and Bruckheimer were there in the theater with you.
:O

:O :O :O. wow. Did any ka-bloomies go that night to that theater?

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In Palmdale, Gore calls me to set, he needs a quick exchange between Pintel and Ragetti as they pass by camera, and he needs it in the next two minutes, as the shot is up. I confer with Lee and Mackenzie, none of our ideas are particularly inspired. We finally hit on the "And in case you haven't noticed, it's raining," "I think that's a bad sign" exchange, which struck us as funny -- as if the appearance of a fifty foot tall goddess isn't a bad sign, or the fact that they face an unbeatable Armada, etc. So it gets shot and it's in the movie, and for me it doesn't quite work, it's one of those lines that's only funny in theory, not really that funny in fact. Also one of those lines you keep re-writing long after the film is done . maybe it should have been, Pintel "... EVERY ten years he can come ashore ." Ragetti "No, AFTER ten years, if his love is true ."

Funny he didn't think that line worked. I think it's my daughter's favourite line in the whole movie. (Certainly the one she quotes most often.) I personally like the fact that it basically has nothing to do with the plot-at-large.

I think that one of the signs of a good writer is that they are always second guessing themselves. In other words they are plagued with never being satisfied with what they have written, always trying to do it better, get it right or whatever. The POTC movies had some excellent writing and character interactions even during some of the less exciting moments. Mr. Rossio gives us a little peek into how his mind works, which helps demonstrate why these three movies have so many fans. It's not just the three gorgeous main characters, it's also the wonderful storyline and the skilled writing behind it.

- Pam -

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So Marty went to the trouble to get a signed DVD for himself. Lee Arenberg was the last to sign, and he wrote Marty's DVD sleeve, "We've had a f**king great time!" Marty was upset. "I can't believe you wrote a swear word on my DVD!" So he had to go to the trouble to get a whole new DVD and have everyone sign it again. Again he gives it to Lee, who writes on it, "Sorry I wrote 'f**k' on your other DVD."

:lmao2:

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I think that one of the signs of a good writer is that they are always second guessing themselves. In other words they are plagued with never being satisfied with what they have written, always trying to do it better, get it right or whatever. The POTC movies had some excellent writing and character interactions even during some of the less exciting moments. Mr. Rossio gives us a little peek into how his mind works, which helps demonstrate why these three movies have so many fans. It's not just the three gorgeous main characters, it's also the wonderful storyline and the skilled writing behind it.

- Pam -

I know what you're saying. (While I wouldn't go so far as to call myself a "writer" I do like to write, and it never fails that the second I decide that I'm finished with something and let somebody else read it, I hate it.) I was just disagreeing with his opinion of that particular line; I thought it worked perfectly.

I do like seeing his opinion and the hows and whys of it all though. :wink2:

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