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Or maybe the Hospitaler's horse was just swallowed up by the Horse Disappearance Fairy. You know, the same one that showed up at the Black Gate.

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Did anybody notice in the burning bush scene David Thewlis's character the Hospitaler arrives unannounced without a horse and is gone without a horse when Balian turns around after the second bush catches fire?
This was spoken about by either Sir Ridley or Bill Monahan (I think it was the latter) in the Commentary track. It was like the scene where the Hospitaler comes in out of focus to close the eyes of Odo after he died, possibly as the Angel of Death. They meant him to be a little on the mystical side, and ambiguous.

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I've had my copy for a week, and with a huge work schedule, finally found a three-hour stretch to watch the director's cut. Everything's been said, so I'll make my comments short. I haven't seen the movie in a year (didn't buy the first DVD). I'd forgotten how interesting, educational, exciting, deep.and bloody this film was. It made me think, and that's the most important thing a movie can do, in my opinion.

I look forward to watching discs three and four.

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I’ve just read through this terrific discussion … glad to have a place where this can happen now that we have the “real” KOH film in our hot little hands. I'm still re-watching the new version and checking out all the extras.

I think the Hospitaler is clearly one of the most important characters in the story. Not only is his dialog The Voice of Wisdom and Clarity, with nearly everything he says ringing with (my personal understanding of) truth, but he’s such a delightful personality. His wry humor and pragmatic observations add a lightness to the heavy drama that’s decidedly welcome. I was tickled by Ridley’s assertion during rehersals that the guy might well have been a junkie, dipping into the laudanum to smooth out the rough spots and allowing him to be such a mellow fellow and cool observer/instructor. I vote for his touching Balian’s brow to be looking for life, not restoring it … but the rest of his actions were - if not “angelic”- a wonderful calm counterpoint to all the hystrionics of others.

As for Sybilla and Guy, I agree with observations made earlier. It was a political liason, arranged for reasons of position and power and having little to do with our concept of a marriage partnership. It’s likely the “marriage” had not been consumated in the traditional way – based on the bargaining dialog between them this new version gives us. “If my son has your knights, you have your wife.” The Jerusalem PTB seemed to consider them a convenient opportunity for political manipulation as well, since they tried to solve problems with another arranged marital event with Balian. Sybilla’s remark about commandments not applying to people like them seems a not-uncommon attitude, as religion was sometimes considered to be only for controlling the masses.

I don’t find this Balian-Sybilla love affair to be morally offensive. I rather preferred the deleted version of his sojourn on the hill of the crucifixion better than the one in the film. It seemed to me that his long, silent night of waiting and meditation ending with the burial of the cross and the simple “goodbye” suggested he had reached a place where he could find closure and move on into the new world that awaited him now that he’d made the long journey (both distance and time) to Jerusalem. It struck me that he had been healed of much of his grief at that point and could move on. She did not have a true “marriage”, so their coming together was acceptable to me.

An adulterous affair could be held up as proof that Balian was not “a perfect knight”, but wasn’t this very notion made a point of throughout the story? - that there was no such thing, nor was it needed. The phrase was most often accompanied by a sneer and Balian himself knew he was nowhere near to “perfect”.

I did love the return of the final clash between Balian and Guy and its end result. I can understand why Orlando was crushed to find it missing from the theatrical film. He had an understanding early on how defining of Balian that fight was … re: his comments during rehersal about how lopping off Guy’s head would have been untrue to everything Balian had learned and then stood for.

Something I found delightful – in a perverse way – was how this director’s cut dealt openly with the editing of the movie and the 2 versions of the script right from the start. Sir Ridley really minces no words about his contempt for the “dumbing down” of story and marketing – and said if people aren’t intelligent enough to get it , then tough. :lol: I tend to agree with him. I really enjoyed the piece where all the filmmakers said how they felt about the way the theatrical film was perceived and critiqued and what their hopes were for the DC edition - that was something new to me on a DVD. Ridley Scott does know how to put together a director’s cut DVD release - he and PJ lead the pack, as far as I’m concerned.

Oh, and I have to confess I wouldn’t mind having sequels that end with Robin Hood if they’re as good as this one was. Or we could just skip to Robin Hood. :) I think we could do with a new Robin of Locksley (one that looks and sounds and acts exactly like Orlando Bloom) – but I wouldn’t mind keeping Alan Rickman on as the Sheriff of Nottingham. :wink:

.

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From Lady Nin's post:

Oh, and I have to confess I wouldn’t mind having sequels that end with Robin Hood if they’re as good as this one was. Or we could just skip to Robin Hood. I think we could do with a new Robin of Locksley (one that looks and sounds and acts exactly like Orlando Bloom) – but I wouldn’t mind keeping Alan Rickman on as the Sheriff of Nottingham

.....looks and sounds and acts exactly like Orlando Bloom -- are you trying to say that you want Orlando to play Robin Hood? From your lips to Ridley Scott's ears.please ! :cheer:

I would love to see Ridley do a serious Robin Hood, with Orlando in the lead portraying a sweaty, bloodied and dirty hero again ! :w00t:

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:cheer: :cheer:

My copy of the DVD arrived in sunny England today :2thumbs: and I've already got my snacks organised. I'll draw the curtains, ignore the urge to soak up vital Vitamin D and just wallow in Balian goodness. :wub:

Thanks to Amazon.com :hug: They're very good to me. :shiny:

I shall now get ready to indulge myself with Orlando. :hott:

Ali

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LadyNin, I agree with everything you said on your review of the EE version of the movie.

Thank you for saying all that, particularly about the Sybilla/Balian love affair. :hug: You are much more eloquent than I could ever be.

Charlie

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I just wanted to point out that in fact Balian never said anything about being a "perfect knight". He said that his father told him to be a "good knight". It was Tiberius who used the phrase "perfect knight". I think there's a world of difference between the two. You can be good and not be perfect. Most of us are good people or try to be. Perfect, is a whole nother story. I think Balian was a good knight. He certainly wasn't perfect.

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I am going to add my voice to the growing chorus of :2thumbs: thumbs up for DC of KOH.I am little disappointed Ridley Scott didn't fight harder to get this cut released.The parts with Balian's wife and interaction with Balian's brother,explained why Balian killed him.I do have to say that two of my favorite parts are Balian's bath scene in :faint: jerusalem and the sword fight between Guy & Balian.The commentary with Orlando& Ridley& William Monahan was fantastic and I'll enjoy watching this for along time to come. reeceehorses

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After watching the Extended Edition of Kingdom of Heaven, all I could think was, wow. I agree that the character development of Sybilla was a much-needed improvement, and made her character fit into the movie better.

What really caught my attention was the commentary with Ridley and Orlando. I loved hearing their opinions about the movie, especially Ridley's take on the love scene between Balian and Sybilla. He's right, those are not easy scenes to do, but Orlando and Eva did an amazing job at not coming across as awkward.

On the whole, this is a much better movie. Even my fiance agreed that it was good, and he wasn't a fan of the original at all. Whoever said this version is a gift was 100% right, and I'm so thankful that we can enjoy the film in all its glory.

Bethany

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I’ve had the DVD for a couple of weeks now, have watched the movie twice, plus once with the commentary track, and I think I’ve seen almost all of the extras, so I though it was about time I popped in here as well to post a couple of words. Apart from lack of time to do so earlier, I also needed a bit of time to kind of come down again from the Balian-high I was on !

What can I say that hasn’t already been said ? This movie is a gem, plain and simple. For years and years, ‘Out of Africa’ was my absolute number 1, to be pushed from its throne by LotR – well, I’m afraid LotR isn’t going to keep the throne for a long time, cos, no matter how much I love the trilogy, I think KOH EE is a very worthwhile contender for that first place, and I can’t make up my mind which one I prefer, LotR or KOH. Maybe I should make them an ex-aequo (sp ?)...

When the theatrical version of KOH came out, I was disappointed - initially. Disappointed and confused. Where were all those magical moments the trailer had promised us ? Almost nothing of what the trailer showed, was actually in the movie, and I left the cinema completely bewildered, that first time. Looking back on it, I guess my problem was having far too high expectations. On the other hand, the trailer had made us have those high expectations of course, and those were the days when I still believed that everything a trailer showed, would actually be a in a movie. (I’ve learned a few things meanwhile.) In any case, it took me quite a few days to digest what I had seen, and to come to see the positive sides of the theatrical cut. Cos even during that first and oh so disappointing viewing, I had already noticed the (many !) positive sides of this cut… only problem was my disappointment was too overwhelming at the time.

All in all, I ended up watching KOH 8 times in cinema, and with each time I saw it, I more and more fell in love with the movie such as it was. It was clear the film wasn’t perfect – far from – and it was clear there were large holes in it (some of the dialogues, and actions as well, didn’t make sense to me at all ! And I clearly remember how glad I was to have read the book ‘The Making of’ before I saw the movie that first time, cos now at least I understood the meaning of Balian touching the flowering shrub at the end.), but it was also clear there was a fabulous movie hiding in what was after all already a great one. And the performances of the actors, and especially of Orlando, already blew me away at that very first viewing.

Now, after having seen the EE cut, I know I was right to have those high expectations. Cos this version delivers with every single scene, with every single bit of dialogue and action. The holes have been sealed, and I think the EE cut even surpasses those high expectations I had. In as far as a movie can be flawless, KOH EE IS flawless indeed. It’s a wonderful, great, and touching story, told in a wonderful, great, and touching way, and I am so very happy to have the chance to watch it over and over again, and to own it. This movie is a masterpiece – a film to watch after you’ve switched off your mobile, pulled the plug of the phone, and stuffed a cloth in the door bell, so that no one can come and disturb you. It’s like a beautiful painting by a famous Baroque master like Rubens. If you can manage to tear your eyes away from Balian (I know, hard job that is !), just take a look at the sets and decors… the attention to detail is just, well, I’ve got no words for it. It's overwhelming almost. Ridley Scott and his crew truly are artists – every single shot of the movie is proof of that, and it also shows in everything we see in the extras.

Talking about the extras, I’d like to say ‘thank God for DVD’s’ – I’ve been glued to our telly screen for hours. What a fabulous pair of extras discs – I don’t think we could have asked for more or better. Without comparing the movies, I think you can safely say that as far as extras are concerned, Ridley has certainly spoiled us just as much as Peter Jackson did with the LotR EE DVD’s. It is fantastic, to be able to watch how a masterpiece like KOH has come to exist.

The new scenes in the movie… Most of you have already mentioned the sword fight between Guy and Balian, at the end of the movie, and YES, it is :censor: fantastic to watch (and I can certainly understand Orlando’s disappointment at this not being in the theatrical cut), but one of the things that stand out for mé, has to be the start of the movie – as I had expected it would indeed, from having read about it beforehand. To see the happiness of and love between Balian and his wife - it makes Balian's grief afterwards so much more palpable and heart-breaking. Then the film switching to the present and Balian being in prison – by the way, the fading from past to present was very simple, but oh so beautiful in its simplicity. And then followed that little sequence that most of all pulled at my heart-strings : to see Balian slowly drag himself into the village again, after his release from prison. All alone, hunched down under the weight of his grief, with only his dog for companion :cry: . His bent back, shoulders pulled up against the cold… the way Orlando in this little scene expressed Balian’s grief brought tears to my eyes. And I dare anyone who EVER again says something about Orlando not being able to express emotions, to be a wooden actor and only a pretty boy and what other nonsense have been written about him !, to watch that scene at the crossroads, where Balian is sitting at his wife’s grave, and his brother comes to taunt him. One look at Orlando’s face here, and the expression in his eyes, should be enough to convince even the greatest critic and cynic that this young man indeed CAN act. And how. If he continues along the same path he has already trodden for a couple of years now, then one day hé himself will be an example for young actors starting out, just like he always mentions e.g. Johnny Depp and Paul Newman as his examples.

Then (to show you all that I have been paying attention to the movie, and not only drooling over Orlando’s Balian :lol: ) a few words about Sibylla. After having seen the EE cut, I feel Eva Green’s work was treated perhaps even more badly than Orlando’s in the theatrical cut. The storyline with her son is simply heartbreaking, and I still can’t believe all of it was cut when releasing this movie into theatres. Sibylla is a woman caught between her feelings for Balian, her love and devotion for her little boy, her sense of duty towards her country, her political responsibilities, and she is caught in a loveless and entirely political arranged marriage (which, without wanting to open up the discussion again, immediately decides it for me whether her relationship with Balian is adultery or not – to me, it isn’t. I simply fail to see how a marriage like Sibylla's and Guy's can be considered a marriage at all. And yes, I agree with those who have said the marriage was most probably not consummated - just think of that sentence : "If my son has your knights, you have your wife."), and Eva did/does a wonderful job at showing all these layers there are to Sibylla. With cutting so much of her work out of the theatrical version, they simply butchered the character, and turned her into not much more but a cheap love interest for Balian – thus rendering their relationship also rather cheap. With re-installing large parts (perhaps even almost everything ?) of Eva’s work, they not only enriched the character of Sibylla and made her much more multi-dimensional, but they also enriched the character of Balian, and the relationship between them.

As for the discussion about Balian grieving for his wife (sorry, can't resist to add my two cents :paperbag: ), as some have already said, I indeed believe you have to take into account the amount of time between the death of his wife, Balian arriving in Jerusalem and burrying the cross, and finally him and Sibylla giving in to the feelings they have for each other. To me, mónths have already passed before he burries the cross at Golgotha, and says goodbye. Saying goodbye however doesn't mean he forgets about his wife and the love they shared, to me it simply means he has decided there has to come a day when he must try to pick up his life again (or start a new one), and I guess Balian simply felt Golgotha was the right place to do so. He felt that day had arrived. Whether this is too soon or not, who can tell ? Is it the amount of mourning we do that shows how much we loved a person ? I think not. We can mourn someone, and still carry on with our lives. Besides, he simply hád to, didn't he ? He's given responsibilities by the King, he couldn't just sit in a corner and cry for the rest of his life. And the fact that Sibylla catches his interest from the moment they meet, well, first of all he's a healthy young man :wink: , and secondly. we don't have a saying about when or where to fall in love. It may be too soon, but who are we to say so ? I can say the same thing here : we can mourn someone, and carry on with our lives - and grow to love someone else. It's not because we love someone else, that our love for the deceased person ceases to exist.

I think it was Adrianne who said she would have loved to see a bit more of Balian grieving - I think he simply didn't have the time for that. What with joining his father's group, his life changes most literally overnight, and it changes once again after he arrives in the Holy Land. Perhaps you could say they could have shown a bit more of his grief during their journey to Messina - sitting hours and hours in the saddle, he did have time to grieve then indeed - but to me personally, I don't think it would have added anything to the movie, or to the character of Balian. The smile he and his wife share at the start of the movie, and the grief we see in his face during that shot in prison, during the scene at the cross roads, and the solemn way with which he carries the cot and baby clothes to the fire in the smithy. to me that was enough to give me a good idea of what this man is going through - and no doubt will go through for months to come. Ridley and William Monahan defined Balian's grief and loss during the start of the movie, and I think they saw no point in returning to it, even though they no doubt had the opportunity. I'm sure if they had felt it would have contributed to the movie, they would have added something to show us Balian's grief even later in the movie - for although we don't see really it, I feel certain it is there.

Anyway, like I said, these are only my personal two cents, and I hope I haven't offended anyone in expressing them.

And to finish these entirely too long ravings, what I also LOVE about this movie, both theatrical as EE cut, is how it tries to do justice to both Christianity AND Muslims. It shows how on both sides there are/were fanatics, people who use(d) their religion for nothing but war-mongering (and who believe(d) they had every right to do so - a right to use that religion, and a right to make war.), but it also shows that on both sides there were and are good and decent people, people who tried (and now try) to do good and who tried/try to live by what Hospitaler said in the movie : `I have no high opinion of religion. In the name of religion, I've seen too many fanatics commit crimes in the name of God. What makes someone a good man, is what you daily decide. God is here and here.' (Sorry, can’t remember the exact words – I know, shame on me !) And no matter how much I love everything about this movie, and in particular the fact that Orlando had the leading role :) and turned his job into such a fine piece of art, that message to me is the most beautiful thing about the entire film. And I bow to both Ridley Scott ánd William Monahan for daring to express this opinion in the time we live in today.

To everyone who was involved in making this movie : a GREAT, BIG thank-you. You have ALL the right to be proud of your work, for all together you have created an incredible masterpiece.

And to everyone who has read this post until the last word, congratulations :) !

Ann

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I finally had the opportunity to watch some of the commentary last night and found it interesting that the whole extended edition movie wasn't included in the cut. Did anyone else notice this? The first part that I noticed was around the time Balian is climbing the hill in Jerusalem and is stopped by the man and children begging.

I was curious about this because in the interview by Dark Horizons posted here, Orlando mentions that he has not seen the entire director's cut. Still, he obviously did the commentary while watching at least parts of the extended film as he refers to specific scenes early on.

I haven't gotten through the whole commentary yet - only as far as Balian awakening in his father's home, but I can't wait to see what further insight is given. I've enjoyed the bits and pieces that Sir Ridley, William Monahan and Orlando have divulged thus far.

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I finally had the opportunity to watch some of the commentary last night and found it interesting that the whole extended edition movie wasn't included in the cut. Did anyone else notice this? The first part that I noticed was around the time Balian is climbing the hill in Jerusalem and is stopped by the man and children begging.
Sherwood, I'm at work, so I can't check this, but I'm pretty sure the scene you are referring to is a deleted/alternate scene and you can view it with or without Sir Ridley's commentary on disc four. I have listened to the entire movie with the Scott/Monahan/Bloom commentary and found it very interesting and most informative. Bill Monahan, in particular, allows his irritation with the whole theatrical release issue to come through.

As for Orlando saying he has not seen the director's cut, I took that to mean he had not had the opportunity to sit and just watch it like a normal viewer.

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Guest Sapphire

I tell you.I was in heaven the whole time my eyes were glued to the TV. It was so much better. It seemed, shall I say, to be perfect! There were a lot of times in the theatrical version where it seemed like scenes were missing. You know, something would happen, then suddenly you're in a new scene and I would be confused about it. I love how everything and the characters are expanded and further explained. Everytime I see the part when Guy hits Balian in the nose with his stick, I flinch and always say, "Why did you have to hit him in the nose like that?!?!?". Now with the EE DVD, Balian's brother smacks him upside the head a few good times--when I first saw that, I died! I thought, "HOW DARE YOU?!?!?!" All in all, I'm am more than pleased with the EE version and must go and hear the commentary now.

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Sherwood, I'm at work, so I can't check this, but I'm pretty sure the scene you are referring to is a deleted/alternate scene and you can view it with or without Sir Ridley's commentary on disc four. I have listened to the entire movie with the Scott/Monahan/Bloom commentary and found it very interesting and most informative. Bill Monahan, in particular, allows his irritation with the whole theatrical release issue to come through.

Maybe I am getting a bit confused. I'm trying to make it through all the extras. There are just so many. It has been like a week or so since I watched the whole film. I know, shame on me! :paperbag: Guess I'll have to torture myself by watching it all again. *sigh* A tough job, but I think I'm up to the task. :wink:

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This terrific movie is still a part of my daily life, a month after its release. Fiore, I just have to say "ditto" to your observations, impressions and feelings about it . me, too!

I had a call from my girlfriend this morning (whom I don't see nearly often enough), to tell me that she had finally acquired a copy of KOH-DC and . wow! She's watched it about 8 times, she said. Sharon was the only person (in my offline life :) ) who was as excited by the theatrical film as I was; we saw it several times together and discussed it ad infinitum at the time. Like the rest of us, she's truly enamored of this "real" version and we chatted at length about how great it was.

Over the weekend, I showed the film for the first time to my grandson, who's 11. From the day I saw it I knew I wanted to share it with him, not because of Orlando (whom he teases me about liking so much), but because of the morality of the tale and the lessons it teaches. I had hesitated because there are real reasons for that R rating. When he learned that David Thewlis - who had played Professor Lupin in Harry Potter/Azkaban - was also in this, he wanted to watch it. Man, it took a lot of pausing for explanations and thumbnail history and geography lessons to get him through it, but he loved it and I think was able to grasp some of the more mature aspects. I hope he will want to re-visit it over the years and will enjoy and learn from the many levels that exist in this gorgeous and important movie.

Have you all seen the comingsoon.net interview, where Orlando said, "I'm really looking forward to that being released [on DVD] and I'm happy it's out there. When you look at a movie like "Blade Runner," when it was released, nobody got it. My hope is that one day, maybe 10, 20 years from now, people will go, Wow, Ridley Scott made a movie about the Crusades at a time when America was at war, at a time when there was a lot of speculation and heat on it, and he still put that movie out there. And hopefully that movie will stand up and people will appreciate it."

Amen! I hope this becomes the definitive version. Maybe we will have to urge the cable networks to show this one instead of the chopped one, since that's where most people see movies. It's so worth the extra time.

.

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Guest wginc

Loved this rendition of Kingdom of Heaven.absolutely.

So much more depth and storyline involved. Answered so many questions I had about the film from beginning to end. All of the extra footage gave this film a totally different flavor.

I'm happy I'm able to sit and enjoy it over and over. Brought my son a copy and I do believe he has seen it as many times as I and my husband have.

A great addition to my small collection of films. Kingdom of Heaven was truly a great film. I loved the entire cast and crew. Being able to see more of what should have been shown on the big screen gave the film so much more body and substance than the original.

This film is oh so very special.and I truly love Orlando being cast in the starring role. I'm happy Ridley Scott chose him.

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I've been watching the film with commentaries recently, and just had to mantion a comment from the visual effects guy's commentary that made me laugh.

Apparently they had to do some visual efects work on Orlando for the shot when he first meets Sybilla, and gives her the drink of water. They had to make his eyes still, because he was essentially checking her out in the take they wanted to use :lol: ! Those lovely eyes of his were looking her up and down.

I don't know why that amused me quite so much, maybe its because we all do the same whenever we get new pictures of Orlando!

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I'm watching KOH again and I have a question about the forest ambush in France. Near the end of the fight Hospitaler rides past Balian and strikes him on the head with his sword. Balian looks at him and nods his head once. I keep wondering what this could mean. In light of what Ridley Scott said about Hospitaler being somewhat mystical, I wonder if it could have meant Balian was touched by God? Is this farfetched? Or maybe he was just being whimsical. :lol: I would love to hear some opinions.

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serendipity, I too always found that little moment thought provoking. The theory I have come up with so far is that Hospitaler is acknowledging Balian's contribution to the defense of the group almost "knighting" him, echoing the motion when the King touches the shoulders of the new knight with the sword that we've seen in a lot of movies. Simultaneously, like you said, we're seeing the mystical god-like Hospitaler blessing or anointing Balian. And we're also seeing a kind of older brother bopping the little kid on the head, just because he can, saying "don't drop your guard, kid."

I'm also mesmerized by the burning bush scene toward the end, where the Hospitaler just disappears and the horse shies as he does so. Was he present? Was he Balian's imagination? Or does he have mystical powers?

I just love this movie.

Aliza

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serendipity, I too always found that little moment thought provoking. The theory I have come up with so far is that Hospitaler is acknowledging Balian's contribution to the defense of the group almost "knighting" him, echoing the motion when the King touches the shoulders of the new knight with the sword that we've seen in a lot of movies. Simultaneously, like you said, we're seeing the mystical god-like Hospitaler blessing or anointing Balian. And we're also seeing a kind of older brother bopping the little kid on the head, just because he can, saying "don't drop your guard, kid."

I'm also mesmerized by the burning bush scene toward the end, where the Hospitaler just disappears and the horse shies as he does so. Was he present? Was he Balian's imagination? Or does he have mystical powers?

I just love this movie.

Aliza

Aliza,

I have to second everything you've said here. It's like a benediction and a warning. And the burning bush scene is curious too. What got me was they said that the horse shied all on its own. They hadn't planned that at all. <cue Twilight Zone music>

Beth 37

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And to everyone who has read this post until the last word, congratulations :) !

Ann

Thank you for the congratulations. :lol: And thank you for the beautiful review , now I think that waiting for the Director's cut in november will be worth.

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Wow,

It's all been said already about how wonderful this version is. TBut I just wanted to add in my view that this is a fabulous film.

I love the extras - I really love the script read through section; it's such a great insight into what actually happens at the start of making a film. And Orlando is looking particularly lovely.

tatoola

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Seems like with every time I watch the EE DVD again, I discover something new. It's just a tiny detail, but at the same time I found it highly significant, so of course I had to tell sómeone. and who better than the ka-Bloomies :) ?

I guess everyone remembers the beautiful rooster we see at the beginning of the movie - right at the beginning of the flash-back to that happy day in Balian's life actually. Well, last week I saw the EE again, and for the first time noticed that there's also a rooster at Ibelin - when Balian for the first time enters the stronghold, and walks into what are his quarters. Before he notices the paintings on the walls, the first thing we see, is another beautiful rooster. I thought that such a wonderful detail - it's like a promise for the happy days Balian will live at Ibelin, and at the same time the rooster links the happy times at Ibelin, to the happy times so long ago in France.

Things like these make me wonder how much there's still hidden in KOH that I still need to discover. I've said it before, but I can't help repeating myself. what a masterpiece this is. I'll forever bow down to the genius of Ridley Scott.

Ann

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